Free Stadium WiFi is like a clean restaurant bathroom – it’s expected

Photo: Shane Harmon, Levis Stadium,

 

Free Stadium WiFi

When we walk into any venue, café or meeting room in the world today one of the and first things we check is whether there is free Wi-fi?  Like a restaurant bathroom it is now a utility we expect and will demand.  The expectation that in exchange for our valued patronage, highly desired attention and personal marketing power  expect the ability to connect, photograph, post, comment, like and share.

Last week, Mark Zuckerberg from Facebook posted that 1 billion people had checked in on one day – (that’s 1/7th of the world’s population!) and of those people most had checked in via their mobile phone.

Yes, we live in a world today where being connected to the Internet and social media via our phones is an essential part of most people’s daily lives – an average 23 minutes a day for every person online.

What will customers want tomorrow and who are the pioneers that are creating the expectations?

Pizzas, I-phones and Football Stadiums

If we think pizza’s we think Dominoes, if we think innovation and technology we think Apple (yes great branding). and if we think football stadiums then we think the 49ers Levis Stadium.

Increasingly when we go to the football – we will expect all the basics – bathrooms, beer, food, entertainment and WiFi.

The Digital Stadium and what’s important to customers?

 

Shane Harmon, Chief Executive of Westpac Stadium in Wellington, New Zealand recently visited Levis Stadium and captured 6 key stadium technology learnings from the 49ers and Levi’s Stadium

  1. Bandwidth and a great wi-fi experience is key
  2. Mobile Ticketing will become the standard
  3. Personalise the fan experience
  4. Keep it simple
  5. Actionable data
  6. Use the data in your storytelling to build your brand

Once you have “the plumbing” (Free Stadium WiFi) in place it’s what you do with it that matters most!  That’s where fan engagement comes in.

Instagram, Flickr, WordPress Website WorkFlow

Model Reading Magazine

My Instagram, Flickr WordPress Website WorkFlow

4:00AM – I’m reviewing my social channels – tags, comments, etc

On Instagram I’m tagged for a recent photoshoot with the beautiful & talented @eliseboony from @cronullasharksmermaids.  I know it’s a tough gig.

But this post is not about cheerleaders and photography – it’s about increasing productivity – I’m obsessed with reducing repetitive tasks, website work flows and ways to increase productivity and marketing effectiveness.

How do I improve my Instagram, Flickr WordPress Website WorkFlow?

No time to waste!

Using Zapier – this initial draft post in WordPress is generated automatically every time I add a photo on my Instagram

Note: From a content point of view there are obviously steps that go before that, ie what is the photo/ blog trying to say?

instagram flickr wordpress website workflow

5:30AM – website coding – linking flickr through to content – another test.

I’ve added the ability to search and select my flickr photos from my blog editor and the convert those images to local copies using flickr importer.

Model Reading Magazine

Finally, some SEO and then we’ll look at distribution technology.

6:15Am – A rewrite and more copy.   The optimum is three hundred words for a blog – I’m currently long way short at 162.

Page Analysis – Revision 7

  • There are 147 words contained in the body copy, this is below the 300 word recommended minimum. Add more useful content on this topic for readers.
  • You have not used your keyword / keyphrase in any subheading (such as an H2) in your copy. (corrected)
  • The keyword density is 0.7%, which is a bit low, the keyword was found 1 times.
  • The copy scores 33.5 in the Flesch Reading Ease test, which is considered difficult to read. Try to make shorter sentences, using less difficult words to improve readability.  After Revision 8 this was increased to 58.4
  • The keyword for this page contains one or more stop words, consider removing them. Found ‘and’.
  • The images on this page do not have alt tags containing your keyword / phrase.
  • The meta description is under 120 characters, however up to 156 characters are available. The available space is shorter than the usual 155 characters because Google will also include the publication date in the snippet.
  • The page title contains keyword / phrase, but it does not appear at the beginning; try and move it to the beginning.
  • No outbound links appear in this page, consider adding some as appropriate.
  • The page title “Instagram, Flickr WordPress Website WorkFlow” is more than 40 characters and less than the recommended 70 character limit.
  • The keyword appears in the first paragraph of the copy.
  • The meta description contains the primary keyword / phrase.
  • You’ve never used this focus keyword before, very good.
  • The keyword / phrase appears in the URL for this page.

#blackout at Shark Park so had to relocate to the new Ultimate Upgrade Experience

#blackout at Shark Park so had to relocate to the new Ultimate Upgrade Experience

Technical Note: Generated from Instagram to WordPress using Zapier – the next step is to look at how to syndicate new web content though Buffer through other channels in order to drive traffic back to the website.   There then needs to be a hook / call to action on the website